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Global Geographical Issues: Urbanisation

Year 8 Geography

Finding Resources in Oliver

 

Here are some books that you may find useful during your studies.  Search the Bennies catalogue Oliver for more, or browse the Non-fiction collection NFS..

 

Useful Links

Urbanisation Reports McKinsey Global Institute presents a collection of reports on the urban world: the shifting global business landscape, cities and the rise of the consuming class, building globally competitive cities, infrastructure productivity, cities as the new global building blocks, and more. Geographies of human wellbeing.

Urbanisation- Science Daily Urbanisation refers to the increasing number of people that live in urban areas. It predominantly results in the physical growth of urban areas, be it horizontal or vertical.The United Nations projected that half of the world's population would live in urban areas at the end of 2008. By 2050 it is predicted that 64.1% and 85.9% of the developing and developed world respectively will be urbanized.Urbanization is closely linked to modernization, industrialization, and the sociological process of rationalization.

C.I.A World Factbook -Ubanisation This entry provides two measures of the degree of urbanization of a population. The first, urban population, describes the percentage of the total population living in urban areas, as defined by the country. The second, rate of urbanization, describes the projected average rate of change of the size of the urban population over the given period of time. Additionally, the World entry includes a list of the ten largest urban agglomerations. An urban agglomeration is defined as comprising the city or town proper and also the suburban fringe or thickly settled territory lying outside of, but adjacent to, the boundaries of the city.

 

You Tube

The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands as one of the world's poorest mega-cities. This YouTube video comes from a GlobalPost series about the rise of mega-cities.

About 10,000 years ago, hunter-gatherers, aided by rudimentary agriculture, moved to semi-permanent villages and never looked back. With further developments came food surpluses, leading to commerce, specialization and, many years later with the Industrial Revolution, the modern city. Vance Kite plots our urban past and how we can expect future cities to adapt to our growing populations.

Urbanisation Knowledge and Partnership

United Nations Populations Fund