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The Big Screen: Where the Wild Things Are- Maurice Sendak

Year 11/12 English Studies

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Biography

Maurice Sendak was born on June 10, 1928 in New York City. The now-renowned children's author studied at the Art Students League and illustrated more than 80 books by other writers before authoring one himself.

Encyclopaedia Britannica

Maurice Sendak, in full Maurice Bernard Sendak, (born June 10, 1928, Brooklyn, New York, U.S.—died May 8, 2012, Danbury, Connecticut), American artist and writer best known for his illustrated children’s books.

ClickView

Yearning for escape and adventure, a young boy runs away from home and sails to an island filled with creatures that take him in as their king.

YouTube

Maurice Sendak created this charming little adventure about a misbehaving little boy, why he's monstrous!

Known for illuminating fantastic nightmares in picture book form -- like his most famous book "Where the Wild Things Are," writer and artist Maurice Sendak died Tuesday at age 83. Jeffrey Brown spoke with Sendak in 2002.

Maurice Sendak Foundation

The Maurice Sendak Foundation, a not-for-profit charitable organization, is devoted to promoting greater public interest in and understanding of the literary, illustrative, and theatrical arts.

Teacher Support Kit

LA Times

Facing the Frightful Things : Books: These days, Maurice Sendak's wild creatures are homelessness, AIDS and violence--big issues for small kids.

The Guardian

Maurice Sendak looks like one of his own creations: beady eyes, pointy eyebrows, the odd monsterish tuft of hair and a reputation for fierceness that makes you tip-toe up the path of his beautiful house in Connecticut like a child in a fairytale.

New York Times

Most of the snuffling, growling beasts that roam and often stomp through “Where the Wild Things Are,” Spike Jonze’s alternately perfect and imperfect if always beautiful adaptation of the Maurice Sendak children’s book, come covered in fur.