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Year 11 Biology- Depth Study Organisation of Living Things: CO2

Year 11 Biology

Finding Resources in Accessit

 

Here are some books that you may find useful during your studies.  Search the Bennies catalogue Accessit for more, or browse the Non-fiction collection NFS.

 

State Library NSW

Suggested Databases-

EBSCO

Proquest

Jstor 

GALE Virtual Reference Library

Informit

AustLit

Hornsby Library

  

Suggested Databases:

Gale Virtual Reference Library

Salem Science

Science Reference Centre

YouTube

Plants play a key role in mitigating climate change. The more carbon dioxide they absorb during photosynthesis, the less carbon dioxide remains trapped in the atmosphere where it can cause temperatures to rise. But scientists have identified an unsettling trend – 86% of land ecosystems globally are becoming progressively less efficient at absorbing the increasing levels of CO2 from the atmosphere.

From Ag PhD Episode #1227 for the week of 10-10-21. Brian and Darren Hefty discuss the importance of plants in relation to carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

Global Warming activists will tell you that CO2 is bad and dangerous. The EPA has even classified it as a pollutant. But is it? Patrick Moore provides some surprising facts about the benefits of CO2 that you won't hear in the current debate.

Trees and other plants help keep the planet cool, but rising levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere are turning down this global air conditioner. According to a new study by researchers at the Carnegie Institution for Science, in some regions more than a quarter of the warming from increased carbon dioxide is due to its direct impact on vegetation. This warming is in addition to carbon dioxide's better-known effect as a heat-trapping greenhouse gas. For scientists trying to predict global climate change in the coming century, the study underscores the importance of including plants in their climate models.

Wang et al. (password protected)

Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and global mean temperature are expected to be significantly higher by the end of the 21st century.

NASA

Elevated carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere may increase water-use efficiency in crops and considerably mitigate yield losses due to climate change, according to a new NASA study.

A quarter to half of Earth’s vegetated lands has shown significant greening over the last 35 years largely due to rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, according to a new study published in the journal Nature Climate Change.

The Conversation

The alarming rate of carbon dioxide flowing into our atmosphere is affecting plant life in interesting ways – but perhaps not in the way you’d expect.

Driesen et al. (public doamin)

Stomata, the microscopic pores surrounded by a pair of guard cells on the surfaces of leaves and stems, play an essential role in regulating the gas exchange between a plant and the surrounding atmosphere. Stomatal development and opening are significantly influenced by environmental conditions, both in the short and long term.

Nature Education

Photosynthetic assimilation of CO2 is central to the metabolism of plants. As atmospheric concentrations of CO2 rise, how will this affect the plants we depend on?

Scientific American

Climate change’s negative effects on plants will likely outweigh any gains from elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide levels.