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Texts and Human Experiences: English Standard

Year 12 English

Common Module

Year 12 Common Module – Texts and Human Experiences In this common module students deepen their understanding of how texts represent individual and collective human experiences. They examine how texts represent human qualities and emotions associated with, or arising from, these experiences. Students appreciate, explore, interpret, analyse and evaluate the ways language is used to shape these representations in a range of texts in a variety of forms, modes and media.

Students explore how texts may give insight into the anomalies, paradoxes and inconsistencies in human behaviour and motivations, inviting the responder to see the world differently, to challenge assumptions, ignite new ideas or reflect personally. They may also consider the role of storytelling throughout time to express and reflect particular lives and cultures. By responding to a range of texts they further develop skills and confidence using various literary devices, language concepts, modes and media to formulate a considered response to texts.

Students study one prescribed text and a range of short texts that provide rich opportunities to further explore representations of human experiences illuminated in texts. They make increasingly informed judgements about how aspects of these texts, for example context, purpose, structure, stylistic and grammatical features, and form shape meaning. In addition, students select one related text and draw from personal experience to make connections between themselves, the world of the text and their wider world.

By responding and composing throughout the module students further develop a repertoire of skills in comprehending, interpreting and analysing complex texts. They examine how different modes and media use visual, verbal and/or digital language elements. They communicate ideas using figurative language to express universal themes and evaluative language to make informed judgements about texts. Students further develop skills in using metalanguage, correct grammar and syntax to analyse language and express a personal perspective about a text.

Unit Description

This unit examines how texts represent the individual and collective human experience. The prescribed text for this unit is the film, Billy Elliot. The prescribed text and a range of short texts should provide rich opportunities to further explore representations of human experiences illuminated in texts. Students will gain insight into the anomalies, paradoxes and inconsistencies in human behaviourStudents will be motivated to see the world differently and challenge their assumptions, ignite new ideas or reflect personally on new concepts. They may also consider the role of storytelling throughout time to express and reflect particular lives and cultures. They will select one related text and draw from personal experience to make connections between themselves, the world of the text and their wider world.

Students have the opportunity to respond to and compose a range of texts, including websites, nonfictional recounts, speeches, news articles and short stories, exploring form and how this shapes meaning. These other texts relate to the prescribed text through the study of particular areas of human experiences, including:

  • The struggle with adversity
  • The pursuit of dreams
  • The search for identity

The complexity of human relationships

Guiding Questions

  1. How and why do composers provide insights through textual representations into the anomalies, paradoxes and inconsistencies in human behaviour?
  2. How do purpose, perspective and context influence the representation of human experiences?
  3. How and why do composers use genre, mode, form, structure and language to represent the complexity of individual and collective human experiences in texts?
 

Do representation of the human experience invite responders to see the world differently, to challenge assumptions, ignite new ideas and reflect personally on their experiences?